Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings


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Try coming up with a few challenges that your characters might struggle with, and write these down on your worksheet. If you need some ideas to get started, try asking some "What if? Your character needs motivation to solve the problem. Why must your character confront this challenge?

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What is the outcome your character hopes for? Sometimes this is obvious, sometimes not. For example, if your main character is a fox, and his challenge is to help some chickens get across the river, the reader needs to understand why the fox wouldn't just eat the chickens instead, since that's how a fox would naturally behave.

Perhaps the chickens have promised the fox something in return for helping them? Or maybe the fox is afraid that the farmer will catch him if he eats the chickens. Making your characters act against their nature can build great tension, but it has to be believable to your reader. Here are some ideas that might motivate your character:. So now you have your character, the setting, and the problem, and the motivation to solve that problem. These parts are usually told in the first section of your story, sometimes in just a few pages.

What Is Narrative Writing, and How Do I Teach It in the Classroom?

Until the climax, the rest of your story is detailing the obstacles - the things that get in your character's way. This will make up most of the pages in your story. Obstacles often come in sets of three. Try including at least this many in your story to start. Did you notice that both of these examples use 3 obstacles? This is a nice number that allows your story to develop, but also keeps the reader interested.

Try using 3 for your story idea, and then add more if you think you need them. Also, remember the character flaws that made the Challenge more interesting? Your character should be transforming as the story progresses, getting a bit stronger, braver, luckier, smarter, etc.

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By the end of the story, the reader should feel that the character has grown or changed into a better person. Obstacles present your character with a chance to grow.

Here are just a few different ideas from which you can create obstacles. What happens if your character? After getting past the last obstacle, your character finally reaches the climax of the story. The tension you have been building in your story is released. The climax is the point at which your characters also confront their own weaknesses. If they are naturally timid, then they may become very courageous at the climax. If they tend to lie, then they will need to tell an important truth. The climax of the story is the proof that your character has really transformed.

The climax is also a great time to reveal an unexpected twist in your story. Just make sure it's believable. If a giant bird suddenly swoops out of nowhere to carry away your villain, your ending will suffer. The best endings often have predictable results, but are achieved in an unpredictable way. For example, you may remember that in the climax of The Incredibles, the family battles with the evil character Syndrome.

Though the Incredibles all have super powers, it is Syndrome's own cape that does him in. Earlier in the story, we learn that Mr. Incredible's costume designer refuses to use capes because they are too dangerous. So, while the ending is unpredictable, it's satisfying because we were introduced to the idea of capes long before the climax. It also reinforces the dangers of vanity - a theme that is repeated throughout the story, and a weakness that gets Mr. Incredible into trouble in the first place.

If you want to test whether your climax is successful, read your story aloud to a friend, and then stop just before the resolution and put the story down. If they demand to hear the ending, you have a good story! You're almost there! Finally, your story needs an ending. After the climax, there are usually some loose ends to tie up.

Free Narrative Writing Samples, Exemplars and Lessons | The Seven Steps

Here are some questions you might try to answer:. You should also think about a theme for your story. Is there a message or special point? Stories are often more interesting and memorable if we learn something from them. Because the theme depends heavily on the outcome of the story, it's usually much easier to decide on a theme after you've completed the 7 steps, and then go back and work the theme into the other parts of your story.

Another way to work on including a theme is to consider proverbs and their meanings.

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Proverbs can be helpful because they communicate important life lessons and themes very concisely. Here's a short list:. Now it's time to start writing. If you've filled out the worksheet download here , congratulations! You already have your entire story line or story arc ready to go!

Creative Writing Activities to Explore

Grade 3 - W. Download it.

Alternatively, this can be used after instruction of a given lesson. It can be a way for students to demonstrate mastery of the content of that lesson. Opening Activity: Know, Want To Know, Learned KWL This activity is a great way to get students engaged in the topic at hand and start thinking about what they know and what to know more about.

Explain the activity to students. K Know - Instruct students to record what they already know about the topic either the one about be to be taught or the one they will be researching on their KWL chart in the K column.

Video 1 Teaching narrative writing

W Want to Know - As a class, discuss things you want to know more about the topic. As students share what they want to know, record it on the board for them to easily see. Students should record the things they want to know or things another student shared that they also want to know on their chart in the W column.

This will get students thinking more deeply about the topic as they head into the lesson or research. L Learned - Tell students that they will come back to this column after the lesson or research. Here they will be recording some of the things they learned. Explain the project to students. Create a book to present what you have learned. Think about how you will illustrate it. Think about how you will narrate it. Will you simply read the facts?

Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings
Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings
Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings
Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings
Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings Lesson Plans The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings

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